Economy Boost, Airport Deal: What Northern Ireland Unionists Get From London

Economy Boost, Airport Deal: What Northern Ireland Unionists Get From London

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May, leaves 10 Downing Street in central London, Britain June 13, 2017.

The source confirmed there was no need for a deal on a so-called “confidence and supply” arrangement to be sealed in order to press ahead with the Speech, and said Mrs May wanted the Government to “get on with its business”.

Sir John Major is one of those urging caution.

The talks are aimed at restoring devolved government to Northern Ireland following the collapse of the Stormont Assembly which worked on the basis of shared power.

The DUP continue to hammer out the details of the deal with the Tories.

The 1998 Good Friday Agreement commits the United Kingdom and Irish Governments to demonstrate “rigorous impartiality” in their dealings with the different political traditions in Northern Ireland.

Commenting on the proposed DUP-Conservative deal, Sinn Féin MP Elisha McCallion said her party’s priority was “defending the Good Friday Agreement, protecting our public services and establishing an executive based on equality and respect”.

AN ANNOUNCEMENT on a crucial deal between the Tories and the Democratic Unionist Party could be delayed until next week because of the London tower block blaze.

She reportedly apologised to Tory MPs, accepting personal responsibility for failing to win an outright victory and sacrificing the parliamentary majority she inherited from David Cameron when she became leader after the Brexit referendum previous year.

They also said the rally would protest the DUP’s record on “access to abortion”, and that if the deal goes through the Conservatives would be joining with a party “known to promote policy which restricts the rights of women and LGBT people”.

The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michael Barnier and the UK’s Brexit minister, David Davis, will meet in Brussels on Monday (19 June), kicking off negotiations likely to take nearly two years.

Irish nationalist party Sinn Fein said the prospect of a British agreement with the DUP was causing anxiety and fear.

Both the Conservative Party and the DUP were now focused on finalising the “terms and conditions” of the deal following a meeting between May and DUP leader Arlene Foster on Tuesday, the DUP source told the channel.

He suggested the DUP would be asking for money and that would be seen as the “government paying cash for votes in parliament“, and would be received badly in other parts of the UK.

Mr Eastwood said in a statement: “The context in which the talks process is now being asked to operate in could have very serious consequences if there is any suggestion of a back room deal with the DUP”.

‘It’s going to be hard, there’s no doubt about that, but perhaps an opportunity to consult more widely with the other parties on how best we can achieve it, ‘ Cameron was reported by the FT as saying at a conference in Poland on Tuesday.

Instead, the shock outcome has left May weakened among her Conservative Party and thrown open her Brexit strategy to criticism from peers, some of whom want to ditch the current plan to leave the European Union single market and customs union.

The European Parliament’s Brexit negotiator, Guy Verhofstadt, also expressed his frustration.

But pressure was mounting for May to change course on the type of Brexit Britain should pursue.

She said: “I think there is a unity of objective among people in the United Kingdom”.

“It’s a unity of goal, having voted to leave the European Union, that their government gets on with that and makes a success of it”.