Qatar withdraws peacekeepers from Djibouti-Eritrea border

Qatar withdraws peacekeepers from Djibouti-Eritrea border

Qatar’s finance minister said on Monday the world’s richest country per capita has the resources to endure and played down the economic toll of the confrontation.

But analysts warn the profitable carrier could take a hit should the diplomatic crisis drag out. USA ambassadorships typically last three years.

Doha mediated the conflict between the two countries in 2010.

Turkey has backed Qatar in a dispute that has ramifications across the Middle East, from Cairo to Baghdad, and raised concerns in Washington and Moscow.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Bahrain and a number of other countries severed relations with Qatar earlier this month, accusing it of supporting armed groups and Iran – allegations Qatar has repeatedly rejected.

United Nations secretary general Antonio Guterres spoke to Kuwait’s deputy prime minister Sheikh Sabah Al-Khalid Al-Sabah on Wednesday and expressed “full support for Kuwait’s efforts to de-escalate tensions and to promote effective dialogue” to resolve the crisis, United Nations spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

Erdogan said it appears that some countries had chose to hand down the death penalty to Qatar and urged Saudi Arabia to reconsider the harsh steps.

“This would appear to be a clear violation of the right to freedom of expression or opinion”, he said in a statement issued before the Bahraini announcement.

Bahraini authorities detained a citizen for questioning on charges of sympathising with Qatar on social media, state news agency BNA reported on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Turkish presidential spokesperson Ibrahim Kalin said at a press conference that Ankara was sending food assistance to Qatar after neighbouring Gulf Arab states imposed sanctions on the country.

Qatar, which has had close ties with Eritrea, deployed a small contingent of peacekeepers along the border between the Horn of Africa neighbours in 2010 after clashes broke out over disputed territory in June 2008.

Al Jazeera’s Amman bureau was closed and stripped of its operating license on June 7, and the channel’s Riyadh bureau was shut down on June 8. Saudi Arabia has also revoked Al Jazeera’s operating license.